Connected Objects
The Sprimo purifier uses clean design to clean air

Dealing with contaminants in the air can be a daily struggle for people ranging from those with asthma to to those allergic to pets. While people think they can head inside to escape hazardous air, that’s not the case at all: the EPA previously stated that indoor air has the potential to be 100 times worse than outdoor air.

That’s why it’s important to have devices like the Sprimo to help clean that air. Most air purifiers are big, bulky, and take time to properly filter out the air in question. The team behind Sprimo claims its small, sleekly design fan is able to filter air 50 times better than other purifiers due to its design. Its Personal Mode immediately creates a bubble of fresh air around a user, while its Turbo Mode — activated when the device is pointed upward so that the air generated is split by its brushed aluminum halo — filters out an entire room’s air quickly. A small Nest-like touchscreen on Sprimo’s face lets users instantly check the contents of their air, displaying the PM 2.5, volatile organic compound (VOC), and CO2 content along temperature and humidity scores.

Sprino even has customizable air filters that are its easily replaceable filters can be sent back to the company to undergo a more rigorous analysis as to what exactly is mucking up the air, going as far as customizing the filters received to the environment’s particular pollutants. $369 gets interested folks their very own Sprimo, slated to ship March 17th, 2017. The product’s Crowd Supply campaign is looking for $250,000 by June 9th, 2016

The idea of personalized — or at least regionalized — air filters holds promise but could become an expensive part of Sprimo ownership. While not advertised as a portable air purifier, the Sprimo is much more portable than traditional air purifiers that usually take up double the room while being half as effective.  In terms of other crowdfunded purifiers, the GiftAir exclusively touts portability but sacrifices usability with its paltry radius of effect. The Sprimo’s versatility lies in filtering out not just traditional allergens but also the man-made, chemically-based pollutants make it more attractive than the much bulkier Evrst and Aspyn, as well.

Nicholas Echevarria currently calls Shanghai home but is a Brooklyn native at heart. He writes about lifestyle, tech, and design and, whenever he gets the chance, indulges his addiction to biking and Hearthstone. Check out some more of his work at https://clippings.me/nicholasechevarria.