Connected Objects
Set it and forget it: The Smart Cube makes anything a safe

editors-choice-300x96The makers of traditional and the more modern versions of safes seem to only understand passports, money, and guns are the only worthwhile things that need protecting. In today’s home, though, things like medicine, cleaning liquids and alcohol should be safely stored away because thieves aren’t the only curious types — babies, teenagers, and even roommates can give them a run for their money.

What’s needed is a solution that’s far more versatile, a solution that can transform any enclosed space into a protected space. The Smart Cube is that solution. It works by being attached to the inside of a drawer, a medicine cabinet, a guitar case — pretty much anything — with strong 3M tape that can withstand up to 100 pounds of force. It communicates through Bluetooth to its companion iOS/Android app so that its built-in proximity sensor automatically locks and relocks when the main Smart Cube user comes near.

This functionality can be extended to anyone else the main Smart Cube user shares access to. In the case the smartphone dies, any smartphone, computer or tablet can control the Smart Cube with an access code to ensure whatever is being protected is always accessible no matter what. Each Smart Cube goes for $69 while packs of two, three, five and ten are available at higher priced tiers as well. Whatever perk is chosen, it is slated to ship in January 2017 should its Indiegogo campaign raise $50,000 by November 2017.

For more valuable goods, a dedicated secure storage solution like the Vaultek is probably a better bet. But the Smart Cube isn’t to secure this level of value. Rather, it’s attractive because it can transform any enclosed space into a far more secure area. While not Vaultek-level safe, it is a great tool for people with roommates, Airbnb hosts, business owners and anyone on-the-go. The Smart Cube’s versatility sets it apart and its low price makes it accessible — especially since most people will be needing multiple Cubes to get the most use out of it.

Nicholas Echevarria currently calls Shanghai home but is a Brooklyn native at heart. He writes about lifestyle, tech, and design and, whenever he gets the chance, indulges his addiction to biking and Hearthstone. Check out some more of his work at https://clippings.me/nicholasechevarria.