Maker/Development
RoboCORE cloud-powered device and development platform opens the door to innovative robotics

Robotics as a hobby is becoming increasingly popular due to the the availability of development platforms such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi. These platforms are inexpensive and extremely customizable, making them especially suited to tinkerers everywhere. Their biggest problems are their lack of power underneath the hood, along with the offline-only limits that stifle all sorts of possibilities.

The RoboCORE is a cloud-powered device and development platform that combines hardware and software into one, streamlining the process for creating all sorts of inventions. It isn’t dependent on any particular mechanics system, so it can paired with anything from Legos to custom metal constructions—the only limitation being the skill and imagination of the person working with it. The RoboCORE’s Intel Edison CPU facilitates the control of both autonomous and remotely-controlled constructions, along with the attached modules, motors, sensors, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi within them. In the right hands, powerful robots can be created, running the gamut from telepresence to connected lawnmowers.

The beauty of the platform is its wireless capability, allowing users to program and control their creations from anywhere using web, Android, or iOS apps that take advantage of Web IDE. The company’s C/C++ proprietary robotics framework, titled hFramework, does the heavy lifting—although users can opt to code in Python as well. None of the advanced knowledge is needed for basic creations, though, as programming templates are available to get those interested started right way.

RoboCORE is another product aiming to streamline the necessities that a maker demands, but that is something a product like Mono does as well. As engaging and helpful as the RoboCORE can be, it will have a tough time garnering attention among a sea of other, more established development platforms.

A RoboCORE with an Intel Edison is awarded for $159, but early birds can grab one for less. The $50,000 campaign is looking to raise the funding by March 13, and expects to get the product out in the summer of this year.

Nicholas Echevarria currently calls Shanghai home but is a Brooklyn native at heart. He writes about lifestyle, tech, and design and, whenever he gets the chance, indulges his addiction to biking and Hearthstone. Check out some more of his work at https://clippings.me/nicholasechevarria.